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Community Meetings and Recognition Ceremonies

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The Division of Forestry and local fire department commonly hold community meetings like this one at Lone Mountain Shores in Claiborne County. Homeowners learn about Firewise practices and solutions for solving community-wide problems. Photo- Leon Konz


The Division of Forestry and local fire department commonly hold community meetings like this one at Lone Mountain Shores in Claiborne County. Homeowners learn about Firewise practices and solutions for solving community-wide problems. Photo- Leon Konz


This meeting here at the Upper Bluff Mountain community in Sevier County was part of the process of their becoming a nationally recognized Firewise Community. After becoming a Firewise Community, they were recipients of a $20,000. grant to cut down and chip-up hazardous brush and trees within their community. Photo- Nathan Waters


Pictured here are representatives from Leadmine Bend, The Highlands, and the Tennessee Division of Forestry. It was December 10, 2010 and they, along with many other folks, were celebrating that both communites had just received their national Firewise recognition. The two communites became the seventh and eight Firewise communites in Tennessee. Photographer- Nathan Waters


The Division of Forestry teaches homeowners how to make their own home assessments. This involves classroom orientation and actual practice completing assessing homes. Here residents of Lone Mountain Shores in Claiborne County are practicing their new assessment skills. Photo- Steve Roark


The Division of Forestry commonly holds ceremonies to celebrate communites becoming a nationally recognized Firewise Community. Here the homeowners of Sprucy Ridge in Johnson County, along with the Cherokee National Forest, Doe Valley VFD, and TDF, celebrate their new recognition status. Photographer- unknown


Once a community completes a community assessment and Community Wildfire Protection Plan, they can apply to become a nationally recognized Firewise Community. Here the community of Cumberland Lakes in Cumberland County receives their Firewise plaque and signs. Photographer unknown


The community of FenceRail Gap in Blount County proudly displays their Firewise Communites/USA sign. Like all other Firewise Communities that have applied for Division of Forestry ìHazard Mitigationî grants, this community received funds to cut down and chip-up hazardous shrubs and small pines that were identified in their protection plan. Photo- Debbie Matteo


As part of FenceRail Gapís recognition ceremony, the Blount County Mayor read a proclamation to celebrate the event. Photo- Leon Konz


Working with local fire departments, the Division of Forestry offers FREE Firewise presentations. They range from as little as 15 minutes to an eight hour workshop designed for community leaders. Photo- Leon Konz


This group of community leaders participated in a free eight-hour Firewise workshop in Carthage. They not only had the opportunity to learn about what makes a good Firewise community, but they got to work group exercises to design-in Firewise practices into a brand new community! It is always best to consider Firewise practices during the planning phase- long before soil is disturbed onsite. Photo- TDF Photograph


At one of their annual Firewise Days, Norris Shoreís homeowners discuss the safe use of chippers with Forestry Technician David Hall. The Division of Forestry will loan a chipper to a community for a few days each year to chip-up their hazardous fuel. Photo- Leon Konz


Here Forester Steve Roark staffs an exhibit at a Norris Shores Firewise Day. The exhibit helps explain Firewise practices to homeowners. The Division of Forestry will gladly set up a display like this for other communites, too, just contact your local TDF office to make arrangements. Photo- Leon Konz


Fire departments play a key role in the success of the Firewise program. Here a member of the Sharps Chapel VFD gives a presentation at one Norris Shoreís annual Firewise Days. Photo- Leon Konz
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